FAQ

/FAQ
FAQ 2017-05-19T03:04:57+00:00

The following Economic Analysis of Working Waterfronts was conducted by Dr. Diane Hite and Mr. Derrick Robinson of Auburn University. Data came from many sources, including existing literature as well as new information gained through surveys conducted online, by telephone and in person.

Figure 1

Working Waterfront Industry Employment Overview

Figure 1 gives an overview of the working-waterfront-related industries in coastal Alabama and Mississippi. It shows the primary contributors to the Alabama working waterfronts are the seafood industry, retail trade, lodging and food service providers and retailers. Figure 1 also examines the industry categories important in supporting tourism. Retail trade, lodging and food service were primary contributors to working waterfronts in Alabama and Mississippi.

Table 1

Economic impacts of 2012 Alabama coastal counties’ seafood product preparation and packaging and commercial fishing (including Mobile and Baldwin) on the Alabama Gulf Coast economy (in 2012 dollars).

Table 1 - Economic impacts of 2012 Alabama coastal counties’ seafood product preparation and packaging and commercial fishing

According to Table 1, the Alabama seafood industry provided $311 million economic impact to the Alabama Gulf Coast economy through sales and $69.3 million dollars value added through businesses using their products (restaurants, grocers, seafood retailers, etc.). The value-added multiplier shows that for every $1 in sales there is a $2.51 increase to the coastal economy provided by businesses adding value to these products.

Table 2

Economic impacts of 2012 Alabama coastal counties’ seafood product preparation and packaging and commercial fishing (including Mobile and Baldwin) on Alabama’s overall economy (in 2012 dollars).    

Table 2 - Economic impacts of 2012 Alabama coastal counties’ seafood product preparation and packaging and commercial fishing (including Mobile and Baldwin) on Alabama’s overall economy (in 2012 dollars).

Comparing Table 1 & 2 we see the impacts are not very different, therefore impacts of the industry are very regionalized very being distributed throughout the rest of the state making the seafood industry that much more important to the region. Although, it’s to be noted that the Mississippi seafood industry has seen a minor expansion while Alabama has experienced a significant decline.

Table 3

Economic impacts of coastal tourism on the Alabama and Mississippi Gulf Coast economy (in 2013 dollars).    

Table 3. Economic impacts of coastal tourism on the Alabama and Mississippi Gulf Coast economy (in 2013 dollars).

Looking at the economic impacts of tourism on the Alabama and Mississippi Gulf Coast economy, Table 3 shows visitor spending in the Alabama and Mississippi Gulf Coast generated a local economic impact of $17,437.1 million in direct sales. The value-added impact was estimated at $9,236.2 million, which represented about a quarter of the five coastal counties’ gross regional product. The labor income impact was $5,767.5 million, about 16.8% of the region’s total personal income. In addition, visitor spending directly and indirectly generated 198,521 full- and part-time jobs in 2013, more than one third of the region’s total employment.

Table 4

Economic impact of Gulf Coast tourism on the non-coastal area of Alabama and Mississippi (2013 dollars).

Table 4. Economic impact of Gulf Coast tourism on the non-coastal area of Alabama and Mississippi (2013 dollars).

Looking at Table 4 we see that the non-coastal economy of Mississippi is more dependent on tourism than Alabama. While we see that tourism is important to both states, the overall economy of Mississippi is more dependent on tourism dollars, especially since survey data show visitors made more trips to Alabama than Mississippi.

Table 5

Economic impacts of tourism on top affected industries in terms of employment in the five coastal counties in Alabama and Mississippi.

Table 5. Economic impacts of tourism on top affected industries in terms of employment in the five coastal counties in Alabama and Mississippi.

Table 5 provides an overview of the impacts of tourism on top affected industries in terms of employment in the five coastal counties in Alabama and Mississippi. This shows the importance of the non-hotel/motel industry, or alternative accommodations (condos, bed & breakfast, etc.). This is especially important when thinking of redevelopment of areas after natural disasters. If tourists are seeking more alternative lodging, developers and land-use planners should seek to provide such accommodations.

Table 6

Working Waterfront Industry/State Employment Impacts

Table 6. Working Waterfront Industry/State Employment Impacts